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Indian Market Logo History

asanta Fe indian market namhinga logo
The Southwestern Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA) is proud to host its 94th year for Native American artists and visitors who travel from around the world. This August 22-23, we will showcase the latest trends in contemporary Native and traditional Native Fine Arts. It is only fitting that the SWAIA logo captures this exciting time in the market when thousands join together and support our Native community’s most talented.

Tewa-Hopi legend, artist Dan Namingha had first presented his Migration symbol in 2002 when he painted the vintage Triumph car during a creative collaboration with other Native artists. The 1974 sports car was donated by strong supporters of the Institute of American Indian Art, Sam and Ethel Ballen, and then auctioned, won by Dr. Elizabeth Sackler. Their generous donation encapsulated the Ballen’s lifelong support of Native artists and the $90,000 proceeds were divided between SWAIA and the IAIA.

Dan Namingha’s captivating Migration symbol, painted on the trunk of Triumph car, captured the attention of SWAIA leadership, who requested permission from Namingha to use the image as the SWAIA logo. Although this logo has had some slight modifications since its first adoption, now it completely represents one’s journey to Santa Fe for the prestigious Indian Market.

The Santa Fe Indian Market welcomes its visitors from all parts of the world and this is expressed in the four colors surrounding the swirl, representing Hopi’s four cardinal directions: yellow for North, red for South, blue for West and white for the East. In Hopi tradition, when a person starts a journey, they begin with a blessing and then continue along their path. Once reaching their place of journey, they will receive their second blessing as they leave.

As you begin your journey to Santa Fe, know that we will welcome each other and gather once more in unity. And when it is time to part ways, we will each take with us a new experience, inspired and blessed as we travel home. This Hopi symbol very much signifies our personal journeys as we self reflect and embrace both our past and future, creating balance and harmony. Hopi traditions are both very much sacred and personal, and Dan Namingha, an artist respecting his role in his family and tribal community, presents us with beautiful Hopi philosophy that encompasses the historical and contemporary migration to the Santa Fe Indian Market.

You can find the work of Dan Namingha at:
NIMAN FINE ART
125 Lincoln Avenue, Suite #116
Santa Fe, NM 87501 USA
Phone: 505.988.5091 Fax: 505.988.1650

References:
www.indianartsandculture.org/whatsnew/?releaseID=289
sflivingtreasures.org/index.php/treasures/189-ballen-sam-a-ethel-.html